Queen’s Law launches program for licensed immigration consultants

Mark Walters, dean of law, said that offering programs online may help Canadians more easily understand the law and may promote access to justice

Queen’s Law launches program for licensed immigration consultants

Queen’s University Faculty of Law has established an online program for students seeking to become regulated immigration consultants.

The Graduate Diploma in Immigration and Citizenship Law consists of nine courses offered across two full-time terms and includes both academic and competency training elements.

Queen’s Law is currently the sole English-language provider of the new diploma program owing to a successful bid back in May 2019, which was announced by the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council, the national regulator for immigration consulting.

This diploma program is also the law school’s third program in the past four years to be launched online. The law school expects to include in-class options late next year.

Mark Walters, dean of law, said that offering programs online may help Canadians more easily understand the law and may promote access to justice, which is a key value of the law school. Laura Kinderman, assistant dean for education innovation and online programs, added that the law school has been working to offer high-quality programs that blend traditional teaching methods with online elements.

In developing the program, the law school consulted with immigration lawyers, regulated immigration consultants and individuals experienced in the areas of immigration and citizenship. With the support of a national advisory council, the law school created a program that seeks to equip prospective immigration consultants with both the academic knowledge and the practical skills needed to succeed.

“Skills have to be equal components with content knowledge, and both have to be integrated, practised and assessed in the program, woven into every course and evaluated,” said the program’s academic director, Sharry Aiken, who is a Queen’s Law professor known for her experience in immigration and refugee law.

Ivory Xi, a member of the national advisory council and a B.C.-based regulated immigration consultant, said that Aiken’s approach allowed the members of the council to contribute their diverse skills and experience.

Interested applicants may now apply for the first cohort, which is expected to commence by January 2021.

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