Ryerson Law School wraps first round of applications on Nov. 1

Ryerson’s new faculty of law is set to host its inaugural class in 2020

Ryerson Law School wraps first round of applications on Nov. 1
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Ryerson’s new faculty of law — set to host its inaugural class in 2020 — has a Nov. 1 2019 deadline for applicants, the website says. The application process, which opened in August, requires applicants after Nov. 1 to submit a Late Application Request. 

The JD-program application, done with the Ontario Law School Application Service, has two categories of admission, with one focusing on Indigenous applicants, who have different requirements for the personal statement and reference letter sections of the application. 

The process to apply requires official transcripts, an LSAT score (by January 2020), a personal statement, letters of reference, a resumé, an online interview — and for non-native English speakers, proof of English proficiency.

Admission decisions for the program, which is now OSAP-eligible, will be released until July 2020, the school’s website says.

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