Queen's Law confers awards to four alumni: Art Cockfield, Pam Hrick, Blaine Favel, Catherine Latimer

Awarding ceremony held virtually on June 2

Queen's Law confers awards to four alumni: Art Cockfield, Pam Hrick, Blaine Favel, Catherine Latimer

The Queen’s University Faculty of Law has conferred alumni awards to four lawyers for their outstanding contributions to their profession, community, and alma mater.

For 2022, the alumni award recipients are the late Art Cockfield, Pam Hrick, Blaine Favel, and Catherine Latimer. Queen’s Law held the awarding ceremony virtually on June 2.

Art Cockfield posthumously received the H.R.S. Ryan Law Alumni Award of Distinction.

Cockfield is a former Queen’s Law professor and associate dean. Aside from his teaching career, he served as a legal and policy consultant to various federal and international organizations, such as the Department of Justice, Office of the Privacy Commissioner, National Judicial Institute, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and United Nations.

Cockfield was one of the world’s most recognized international tax law scholars. He authored several tax law publications often cited by the Supreme Court of Canada and received several research grants worth more than $6 million from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

Alumni who have contributed significantly to the faculty, university, or legal profession receive the H.R.S. Ryan Award.

Pam Hrick is the recipient of the Dan Soberman Outstanding Young Alumni Award.

Hrick currently serves as the executive director and general counsel of the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund (LEAF). She leads the organization’s work to advance gender equality through litigation, law reform, and public education.

Hrick joined LEAF from Stockwoods LLP, where she practised in the areas of civil and commercial litigation, administrative law, and criminal law. She previously clerked for SCC Justice Thomas Cromwell and Federal Court of Appeal Justice David Stratas.

The Soberman Award is for alumni who have graduated within the last 10 years, are under 35 years of age, and have demonstrated promising future leadership through outstanding professional achievement, community service, or commitment to Queen’s Law.

Blaine Favel received the J.A. (Alec) Corry Distinguished Alumni Award.

Favel is an entrepreneur, policy advisor, public advocate, and educator. He previously served as the chief of the Poundmaker Nation and Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (now Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations).

As a Poundmaker Cree Nation member, Favel has devoted his 30-year career to building bridges between Indigenous communities and the government. He set up the first Indigenous casinos, helped establish Canada’s first Aboriginal-controlled bank, arranged Indigenous participation in several agricultural and energy companies, and negotiated Indigenous interests in major western resource projects.

The Corry Award recognizes alumni who have excelled in their careers outside the traditional practice of law.

Catherine Latimer is the recipient of the Justice Thomas Cromwell Distinguished Public Service Award.

Latimer is the executive director of the John Howard Society of Canada since 2011. She helped develop the Youth Criminal Justice Act, appeared before Parliamentary and Senate committees, and supported public interest interventions before every court level.

Latimer worked as an adviser to the Solicitor General, Privy Council’s Office, and Justice Canada. She also headed the National Associations Active in Criminal Justice. This special interest group enhances the capacity of its member organizations to contribute to a just, fair, equitable, and effective justice system.

The Cromwell Public Service Award recognizes alumni who have demonstrated outstanding service to the public as a government or public service lawyer or member of the judiciary. 

“Among all the worthy nominations received for 2022, these four stood out as major influencers,” Queen’s Law dean Mark Walters said. “Their leadership in affecting change – whether for legal professionals, academics and students, marginalized group members, or Indigenous peoples – has certainly enriched Canadian society as a whole.”

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