Analysis and reasons so inadequate that they could not be considered reasonable

Federal court | Immigration

REFUGEE STATUS

Analysis and reasons so inadequate that they could not be considered reasonable

Refugee claimants were citizens of Croatia of Serbian ethnicity who alleged fear of persecution by reason of their ethnicity. Claimants alleged that they had difficulty in obtaining work, suffered discrimination in workplace, and were verbally harassed. Board found that incessant and repeated acts of discrimination suffered by all members of family by reason of their nationality, particularly their son being beaten and discrimination suffered by female claimant in finding employment, amounted to persecution. Board found that state protection would not be forthcoming as claimants had made several attempts to obtain protection from police authorities and although police responded on every occasion, they consistently failed to provide adequate level of protection to family. Board found that documentary evidence confirmed that discrimination against ethnic Serbs existed throughout Croatia, and that claimants would not likely be able to find gainful employment in all of Croatia. Board concluded that claimants were Convention Refugees and Minister applied for judicial review. Application granted. Board failed to properly consider evidence before it, and its analysis and reasons were so inadequate that they could not be considered reasonable. Board’s finding that incessant and repeated number of acts of discrimination suffered by all members of family amounted to persecution did not accord with evidence before it. Board’s finding that police consistently failed to provide adequate level of protection was not grounded in evidence as board recognized that police responded on every occasion that they were called by claimants and there was no evidence that police failed to follow through on any investigations or failed to provide any services. Board’s treatment of existence of internal flight alternative was deficient and not grounded in evidence before it. Board failed to properly consider evidence before it, and its analysis and reasons were so inadequate that they could not be considered reasonable.
Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration) v. Viljanac (Mar. 21, 2014, F.C., Daniele Tremblay-Lamer J., File No. IMM-3807-13) 239 A.C.W.S. (3d) 458.

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