McCarthy Tétrault welcomes new partner in Toronto

Aliya Ramji to focus exclusively on start-ups, scale-ups and other fast-growth businesses

McCarthy Tétrault welcomes new partner in Toronto
Aliya Ramji

McCarthy Tétrault recently welcomed Aliya Ramji as a partner in Toronto.

Ramji was previously senior director, legal and corporate affairs at Figure1, a med-tech start-up for health care professionals. She also teaches legal aspects of international business and business law at Ryerson University.

In her new role, Ramji will focus exclusively on start-ups, scale-ups and other fast-growth businesses. In addition to delivering legal advice and services to high-potential businesses in the start-up or scale-up phase, Ramji will also advise venture capital, angel and strategic investors, as well as parties looking to create strategic alliances or partnerships with founders or start-ups.

Ramji earned a J.D. from Queen’s University and a Masters in Law from NYU School of Law. She is called to the bar in Ontario and New York.

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