CBA president, OHRC react to MMIWG report

Following the turnover of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls report to the federal government, the Ontario Human Rights Commission and the president of the Canadian Bar Association have issued their responses.

CBA president, OHRC react to MMIWG report
Ray Adlington

Following the turnover of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls report to the federal government, the Ontario Human Rights Commission and the president of the Canadian Bar Association have issued their responses.

 

According to Ray Adlington, CBA president, the association welcomes the report and expresses its gratitude for the contributions of the survivors and families.

 

“We will be looking carefully at all of the report’s calls for justice, particularly those aimed at the legal profession and the justice system generally,” Adlington said in a statement.

 

“The CBA has a long history of advocating for the rights of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian justice system, and a number of initiatives are already underway,” he said. “For example, we are moving forward in the development of training programs for Canadian lawyers on cultural competency and Indian residential school legacy, which the report talks about in its calls for justice.

 

“The CBA is committed to continuing this work, and will look for ways to contribute to addressing the dire situation outlined in the report.”

 

Meanwhile, the OHRC reiterated its commitment to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and vowed to take up the report’s calls for justice.

 

“Consistent with call for justice #1, the OHRC will take concrete steps, in collaboration with diverse Indigenous peoples, to ensure that the Ontario Human Rights Code becomes an effective tool to implement the UN Declaration at the provincial level, to address persistent gaps in service delivery to Indigenous peoples both on and off reserve,” said Renu Mandhane, chief commissioner of the OHRC. “Consistent with calls for justice #3 and #7, the OHRC will also use its enforcement powers to ensure culturally safe delivery of health and police services in Northern Ontario.

 

“Consistent with call for justice #5, the OHRC will ensure that its forthcoming policy on racial profiling in law enforcement reflects the lived experiences that lie at the heart of Reclaiming Power and Place. In particular, we will consider how police failure to adequately protect Indigenous women and girls and 2SLGBTQQIA people is a unique form of racial profiling based on persistent and damaging stereotypes.”

 

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