Ontario Civil


Constitutional Law

DISTRIBUTION OF LEGISLATIVE AUTHORITY
By-law did not impact or intrude on core of federal power

Applicant operated aerodome in respondent city. Applicant had been undertaking number of improvements to aerodome that involved use of fill. Applicant refused to comply with city’s by-law because aerodomes fell under federal jurisdiction and by-law did not apply to it. Parties brought competing applications. Application judge declared that by-law was valid and binding on applicant in respect to landfill activities. Applicant appealed. Appeal dismissed. Application judge undertook relevant analysis in determining whether interjurisdictional immunity applied. Application judge correctly characterized by-law. Real issue was whether by-law impermissibly trenched on core of federal aeronautic power. Effect of by-law was not to improperly intrude into development of aerodrome qua aeronautical enterprise. By-law was designed to regulate quality of fill and prevent use of toxic or contaminated fill in city. By-law did not impact or intrude on core of federal power.

Burlington Airpark Inc. v. Burlington (City) (Jun. 13, 2014, Ont. C.A., J.C. MacPherson J.A., Janet Simmons J.A., and E.E. Gillese J.A., File No. CA C57908) Decision at 234 A.C.W.S. (3d) 896 was affirmed.  241 A.C.W.S. (3d) 106.

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