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This Week's Issue

Ruling opens door to umbrella purchaser suits

Alex Robinson - Monday, August 22, 2016

A recent Divisional Court decision to grant leave to plaintiffs of an uncertified part of a class action lawsuit opens the door to an increase of claims brought by what’s known as umbrella purchasers, some competition lawyers say.
The Divisional Court granted leave to the plaintiffs of claims in Shah v. LG Chem, Ltd., which concerns allegations that a number of companies were part of a global price-fixing conspiracy on lithium-ion batteries.

The motion judge, Superior Court Justice Paul Perell, certified the action.

However, he refused to certify claims relating to unlawful means conspiracy and those advanced on behalf of umbrella purchasers — claimants who did not bu...


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Judicial discipline needs more public input

Alberta Judge Robin Camp’s upcoming hearing concerning misconduct allegations will likely shine a spotlight on the judicial discipline system this fall, as the federal government looks to reform the process.

Legal Tech Now Part 3: Canadian A2J apps at the starting line

Need help navigating the Small Claims Court process?

Editorial: Smart v. wise

In an age that glorifies Big Data and everything digital, it’s rare to hear a lone dissenting voice that advocates for face-to-face contact. But at the recent Canadian Bar Association conference in Ottawa, writer Susan Pinker advocated roundly for the value of connecting in person. It enhances our health outcomes and our sense of social connectivity in ways digital connection can’t, she says.

Letter: LSUC responds to discrimination allegation

I am writing in response to the article “Lawyer alleges discrimination by LSUC security guard,” published in the July 25, 2016 issue.

Speaker's Corner: The roots of the articling crisis

Since the Great Recession of 2007-2009, there has been a lot of media commentary blaming the sometimes-bleak economic prospects of young lawyers on law schools. In this coverage, you’ll also hear complaints about the lack of utility of a law degree, the high tuition for the law school and the debt it creates, as well as the competitiveness of the job market for lawyers upon graduation.

Focus: CPP enhancements spotlight existing pension plans

After spending the past year advising clients on the Ontario government’s plan to introduce its own Ontario Registered Pension Plan, pension lawyers are scrambling to shift their focus on the Canada Pension Plan.

Inside Story

Monday, August 22, 2016

LAWYERS TEAM UP TO LAUNCH ROSEN SACK LLP
Toronto lawyers Avra Rosen and Susan Sack have joined forces to start a new firm called Rosen Sack LLP.

The two lawyers have been friends since they were put in the same section at Osgoode Hall Law School in the 1980s.

“We are two very strong women, advocates, trial lawyers — very similar in the way we approach things and how we have compassion for our clients and strive for excellence,” Rosen says.

Called to the bar in 1987, Rosen practised family law while Sack initially pursued commercial litigation.

Rosen has had her own family law firm, Law Offices of Avra Rosen, for the last 19 years. She says one of her only sticking points of creating the new firm was that everything in her office remains purple — which has become what she calls her “colour trademark.”

Sack, who recently left Basman Smith LLP, focuses the majority of her practice...

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A Law Times column this week argues that people should not have to get undergraduate education before going to law school. Do you agree with this position?
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