Focus On


  • Improvements suggested for foreign worker program
    Jacqueline Bart says she welcomes the additional level of accountability that enhanced powers have brought for businesses using the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

    Improvements suggested for foreign worker program

    The federal government has some improvements to make in its regulation of the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, according to immigration lawyers.

  • Umbrella damages case going to the Supreme Court
    Michael Osborne says an upcoming case will hopefully rectify a ‘misinterpretation of the Supreme Court’s decision in the indirect purchaser trilogy.’

    Umbrella damages case going to the Supreme Court

    The Supreme Court of Canada has granted leave in Pioneer v. Godfrey, a class action case that deals with “umbrella damages” in competition law, where the case law between British Columbia and Ontario differs.

  • Bureau offers guidance on efficiencies analysis
    Debbie Salzberger says that an efficiencies defence could mean the difference between a merger going through or having it blocked.

    Bureau offers guidance on efficiencies analysis

    The Competition Bureau released a draft guidance document on efficiencies analysis in merger reviews, which has allowed otherwise anti-competitive mergers to happen in Canada that would be blocked in other jurisdictions.

  • New competition commissioner needs vision

    The federal government is searching for a new competition commissioner following the retirement of John Pecman and appointment of an interim commissioner.

  • Supreme Court declines leave to appeal in TREB case
    James Musgrove says the SCC ruling in TREB opens up the grounds for abuse of dominance cases and may have broad implications.

    Supreme Court declines leave to appeal in TREB case

    In August, the Supreme Court of Canada dismissed leave to appeal in the case of the Toronto Real Estate Board in its dispute with the competition commisioner, a case that touches on the intersection of competition law and privacy.

  • Worker wins damages after colleague says racial slur
    Tanya Walker says companies need to take complaints from their employees seriously and investigate issues right away.

    Worker wins damages after colleague says racial slur

    The Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario has ordered a man who used a racial slur to pay $1,000 in damages to a colleague who overheard the comment in a workplace lunchroom.

  • Injured migrant worker to get partial benefits
    Maryth Yachnin says migrant workers who are injured in Ontario ‘get a fraction of the benefits that Ontario workers get.’

    Injured migrant worker to get partial benefits

    A Jamaican migrant worker who was injured while picking fruit at an Ontario farm will be eligible to receive partial benefits for loss of his earning power, after a decision by the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal.

  • Regulations can’t prevent police racial profiling
    Osborne Barnwell says police officers need to build better relationships with the community to encourage people with information about crimes to come forward.

    Regulations can’t prevent police racial profiling

    Lawyers continue to raise concerns that street checks by police disproportionately impact people from racialized communities, a few months before the scheduled completion of a report about provincial regulations on police checks.

  • Genetic discrimination unclear in provincial law
    Peter Engelmann says it’s unfortunate that bill 164 never became law before the provincial Liberal government dissolved.

    Genetic discrimination unclear in provincial law

    Canadians continue to need greater protection against discrimination on the basis of genetic characteristics, lawyers say.

  • Lawyers favour mediation over litigation: report
    Christine Vanderschoot says the availability of mediators at courthouses helps make it more accessible.

    Lawyers favour mediation over litigation: report

    Ontario family lawyers continue to favour settling disputes through mediation, saying it produces better results for separating couples and their children, as well as saving time and money.

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