Focus On


  • Regulations about crypto-currencies remain uncertain
    Usman Sheikh says it’s ‘almost every day that you see a new project being introduced’ related to crypto-currencies.

    Regulations about crypto-currencies remain uncertain

    Lawyers are keeping a close eye on regulations about crypto-currencies, while advising more businesses about how to use the technology.

  • Privacy of documents at border under question
    Allan Oziel says using separate devices for travel may be a good idea, but it might not always be practical.

    Privacy of documents at border under question

    Recent guidelines about searches of electronic devices at Canadian and U.S. borders have reinforced lawyers’ need to protect privileged information on their digital devices when crossing the border.

  • Businesses should consider assistance post-NAFTA
    Andrew Lanouette says news that Canada was included in the list of countries on which the U.S. was imposing tariffs caught people by surprise.

    Businesses should consider assistance post-NAFTA

    Businesses should thoroughly examine their products and consider available government assistance programs to weather the economic uncertainty caused by the ongoing trade battle between Canada and the United States over steel and aluminum products, lawyers say.

  • Rules change could hamper access to justice: advocates
    Quinn Ross says proposed changes to the Federation of Law Societies of Canada’s model rules could make it harder for marginalized groups.

    Rules change could hamper access to justice: advocates

    The Ontario Bar Association is raising concerns about how amendments to the Federation of Law Societies of Canada’s model rules to prevent money laundering could negatively impact access to justice.

  • Personal injury lawyers turn to litigation financing
    Heidi Bergeron says she has begun using various products to ‘stay on a level playing field’ with the defence in personal injury litigation.

    Personal injury lawyers turn to litigation financing

    Lawyers who represent plaintiffs in smaller personal injury firms say they are turning to specialized litigation financing to fund disbursements and expert witnesses, as well as other expenses.

  • Insolvency disputes a growing area for litigation funding
    Alex Ilchenko says a recent Quebec case is an indication of a greater trend for debtors to use litigation funding in Canadian legal practice.

    Insolvency disputes a growing area for litigation funding

    A recent Quebec case saw the court approve a funding arrangement between a litigation financing company and an insolvent company in order to fund a lawsuit against the insolvent company’s largest creditor, with the financing company getting a share of the proceeds if successful.

  • Lawyers advise against treatment loans
    Deanna Gilbert says she advises lawyers to sit down with their clients to explain how the loans charge interest rates and how that amount can accrue over time.

    Lawyers advise against treatment loans

    As governments have scaled back the insurance coverage available for medical treatments available to those who have been injured in accidents, treatment loans are becoming available to clients as a means of keeping treatments going until a trial or settlement.

  • Should cost protection insurance be mandatory?
    Charles Gluckstein says it’s important for lawyers to discuss cost protection insurance with clients from the outset, as the cost of it will increase the longer they wait.

    Should cost protection insurance be mandatory?

    As cost protection insurance becomes more common as part of litigation financing in Canada, lawyers have noted that, in the United Kingdom, lawyers are required to let commercial litigation clients know about its availability or they can be found negligent. Lawyers say it is already becoming good practice in Ontario to discuss cost protection insurance with clients.

  • Legal battle over dial-a-dope operations may go to SCC
    Michael Lacy says a recent case before the Ontario Court of Appeal was the first time the court was asked to deal with dial-a-dope operations directly.

    Legal battle over dial-a-dope operations may go to SCC

    A legal battle over whether certain kinds of undercover investigations are entrapment when there is not reasonable suspicion that a specific target is engaged in criminal activity may ultimately be headed to the Supreme Court of Canada.

  • No end to Mr. Big investigations after Hart
    Alison Craig says trial courts are still granting too much leeway to police when it comes to Mr. Big investigations.

    No end to Mr. Big investigations after Hart

    After the Supreme Court issued its ruling in July 2014 in R. v. Hart, which outlined a framework for trial courts to assess “Mr. Big” police undercover operations, the characterization of the decision by major media outlets and some legal scholars was similar.

cover image

DIGITAL EDITION

Subscribers get early and easy access to Law Times.

Law Times Poll


By 2025, there is expected to be 1.6 new licensed lawyers for every one new practising position, according to a Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario report. Does this mean positions should be restricted in law schools?
RESULTS ❯