Focus On


  • Clarity around reunification therapy orders provided
    Beverley Johnston says there had been conflicting rulings at the Ontario Superior Court of Justice when it came to reunification therapy.

    Clarity around reunification therapy orders provided

    In cases where there is genuine alienation between a parent and child, a court may look to order reunification therapy as a means of reconciling them.

  • Ruling changes the way co-parents recognized
    Marta Siemiarczuk says a recent Ontario Superior Court of Justice decision helps to expand the concepts of family and parenting, both legally and socially.

    Ruling changes the way co-parents recognized

    A recent case has changed the laws in Ontario around adoption after two women successfully challenged the 2017 changes to the provincial Child, Youth and Family Services Act.

  • Divorce Act changes bring in less adversarial language
    Ron Shulman says he is pleased by the introduction of contact orders in the new federal Divorce Act, which allow for non-spouses such as grandparents to have time with children.

    Divorce Act changes bring in less adversarial language

    Last year, headlines were made when the federal government announced an overhaul to the federal Divorce Act.

  • Grey divorces pose legal challenges
    Georgina Carson says most ‘grey’ divorces deal with situations where children are grown up, which eliminates custody and access issues.

    Grey divorces pose legal challenges

    Divorces that happen later in life can have unique legal challenges, such as the proximity to retirement, life insurance and whether or not grown children become participants in the proceedings.

  • Program unfair until cap lifted
    Matthew Jeffery says a new federal system where people sponsor family members to come to Canada is only marginally better than the old lottery.

    Program unfair until cap lifted

    The Sponsorship of Parents and Grandparents program will retain an element of unfairness until the annual cap on applicants is lifted, according to some immigration lawyers.

  • Uncertainty around program causes concern
    Barbara Jo Caruso says it’s important for the federal government to get a program aimed at foreign caregivers right.

    Uncertainty around program causes concern

    Just more than a year ago, the federal government confirmed the expiry in November 2019 of two pilot programs allowing caregivers for children and adults with high medical needs to apply for permanent residence following admission under the Temporary Foreign Worker Program.

  • Process for getting LMIAs should change
    Wennie Lee says the difficulty in obtaining a labour market impact assessment is hampering employers’ ability to respond to skills shortages in certain industries and regions of the country.

    Process for getting LMIAs should change

    The process for obtaining a Labour Market Impact Assessment must change to better reflect the reality of global commerce, according to a Toronto immigration lawyer.

  • Debate over birthright citizenship emerges
    Jamie Liew says there is currently no legal bar to birth tourism in Canada, and she strongly opposes any amendment that would tackle it by ending birthright citizenship.

    Debate over birthright citizenship emerges

    Eliminating birthright citizenship would be an overreaction to fears about a growth in birth tourism, according to an Ottawa immigration law professor.

  • Additional changes for employment laws proposed
    Lucas Mapplebeck says changes to overtime and averaging agreements in Ontario are ‘very relevant.’

    Additional changes for employment laws proposed

    Ontario’s employment and labour laws could undergo more changes in 2019. On Dec. 6, the government introduced Bill 66, Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act.

  • Employee misclassification remains key concern
    Tassia Poynter says she believes the first class action lawsuit alleging employee misclassification in the factual television industry has emerged.

    Employee misclassification remains key concern

    Ontario courts could once again be asked to rule on whether workers are “employees” or “independent contractors,” a proposed lawsuit says.

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