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Back to the grindstone

Editorial Obiter

A busy fall season lies ahead for lawyers. Summer is typically thought of as a season best suited for rest and relaxation. But this summer, with a new provincial government in power, the legislature continued sitting into August, with a slate of new announcements that came down the pipeline.

Then there’s the impending legalization of the use of recreational cannabis coming in October. These changes in policy direction will have wide-reaching impacts for lawyers. Annamaria Enenajor, partner at Ruby Shiller Enenajor DiGiuseppe Barristers and director of the Campaign for Cannabis Amnesty, is one of a number of lawyers who have expressed concerns with a cannabis retail plan opt-out option that exists for municipalities in Ontario.

“Fear of the unknown drives a lot of these opt-out policies, and they’re not based on any evidence that these opt-out policies or refraining from participation in the legal industry would be beneficial to communities and be protective of young people or other vulnerable members of communities,” she says.

But some municipalities beg to differ.

This issue of Law Times touches on a variety of issues you’ll be sure to hear about in the months ahead. Another piece focuses on an upcoming case before the Supreme Court of Canada.

The Supreme Court decision in Tom Le v. Her Majesty The Queen could impact people who currently do not have standing to challenge a search or detention when they are an invited guest on a property. Then there’s a section of features on human rights law, which focuses on police carding, legislation related to genetic discrimination, migrant workers’ rights and an award made by the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario to a worker who overheard a racial slur.

Gear up and read on — there’s much to delve into, no matter what your practice area is.


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