professional regulation


  • Apparent conflict of interest existed: ruling

    Apparent conflict of interest existed: ruling

    Oct 16, 2017

    The Ontario Court of Appeal has ruled that a lawyer who represented an insured had an apparent conflict of interest, as he was appointed, paid and instructed by an insurer that would have benefited from a ruling that wouldn’t be aligned with the insured’s interests.

  • Some Alternative Business Structures approved

    Some Alternative Business Structures approved

    Oct 2, 2017

    Some personal injury lawyers are concerned that new Alternative Business Structure initiatives approved by the Law Society of Upper Canada are the beginning of a slippery slope toward non-lawyer ownership of law firms. LSUC benchers approved a motion at their September meeting to allow non-profits and charities to provide legal services through practitioners.

  • Convocation nixes ‘Upper Canada’ in LSUC

    Convocation nixes ‘Upper Canada’ in LSUC

    Oct 2, 2017

    Some lawyers say changing the name of the Law Society of Upper Canada is just a distraction from the real work that needs to be done in order to address barriers to access to justice. The law society’s governing body, Convocation, voted to discard “Upper Canada” from the regulator’s name at its September meeting. Benchers will consider a new name in November.

  • About time

    Oct 2, 2017

    In May, a Law Times columnist wrote a piece exploring the colonialist legacy inherent in the name of the Law Society of Upper Canada. “As a lawyer, I am required to pay membership fees to an organization whose title includes the name ‘Upper Canada.’

  • Entity regulation encouraged to boost diversity

    Entity regulation encouraged to boost diversity

    Sep 25, 2017

    To really address barriers faced by racialized licensees, some lawyers say the Law Society of Upper Canada needs to implement entity regulation to significantly boost diversity in the legal profession. The law society is rolling out a first round of recommendations approved by Convocation in December 2016 to battle the barriers faced by racialized licensees.

  • Contingency caution

    Sep 25, 2017

    Controversy over contingency fees isn’t new. However, a ruling this week in the family law realm has important takeaways. In Jackson v. Stephen Durbin and Associates, Ontario Superior Court Justice Thomas Lofchik ordered a Toronto law firm to refund a $72,000 premium it charged to a family litigant for the favourable result achieved at trial in a custody battle.

  • $4.6 million sought in negligence lawsuit

    $4.6 million sought in negligence lawsuit

    Sep 11, 2017

    A lawyer who is already under investigation by the Law Society of Upper Canada for a $3-million deficiency in his trust account is now facing allegations of negligence over how he represented a former client in loan transactions.

  • Life benchers concerned over shrinking role

    Life benchers concerned over shrinking role

    Sep 5, 2017

    Life benchers are decrying their diminished role in the Law Society of Upper Canada’s governing committees. At a special Convocation meeting in August, some life benchers took the opportunity to express concerns they had over their exclusion from many committees.

  • A crisis of values over articling

    Sep 5, 2017

    Talk of the articling crisis has become white noise. Unfortunately, we have now internalized it: It has become a crisis of values within the profession.

  • Could Jordan principles be applied to LSUC proceedings?

    Could Jordan principles be applied to LSUC proceedings?

    Aug 28, 2017

    In the wake of last year’s Supreme Court of Canada decision in R. v. Jordan, lawyers are wondering if a similar approach could be applied to Law Society of Upper Canada proceedings that face long delays.

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