law societies


  • Correcting the record on LSUC diversity statement

    Correcting the record on LSUC diversity statement

    Oct 23, 2017

    This fall, the Law Society of Upper Canada advised licensees that they must create and abide by an individual statement of principles that acknowledges their obligation to promote equality, diversity and inclusion generally and in their behaviour toward colleagues, employees, clients and the public.

  • Petty position

    Oct 23, 2017

    There’s an old adage: If you argue for your limitations, you get to keep them. I was reminded of this phrase recently as controversy trickled up about a statement of principles lawyers will be required to sign. The issue is, admittedly, complex.

  • LSUC statement of principles faces some backlash

    LSUC statement of principles faces some backlash

    Oct 23, 2017

    Bencher Joe Groia has also submitted a motion asking Convocation to reconsider the statement of principles and requesting that conscientious objectors be exempt from the requirement.

  • Some Alternative Business Structures approved

    Some Alternative Business Structures approved

    Oct 2, 2017

    Some personal injury lawyers are concerned that new Alternative Business Structure initiatives approved by the Law Society of Upper Canada are the beginning of a slippery slope toward non-lawyer ownership of law firms. LSUC benchers approved a motion at their September meeting to allow non-profits and charities to provide legal services through practitioners.

  • Convocation nixes ‘Upper Canada’ in LSUC

    Convocation nixes ‘Upper Canada’ in LSUC

    Oct 2, 2017

    Some lawyers say changing the name of the Law Society of Upper Canada is just a distraction from the real work that needs to be done in order to address barriers to access to justice. The law society’s governing body, Convocation, voted to discard “Upper Canada” from the regulator’s name at its September meeting. Benchers will consider a new name in November.

  • About time

    Oct 2, 2017

    In May, a Law Times columnist wrote a piece exploring the colonialist legacy inherent in the name of the Law Society of Upper Canada. “As a lawyer, I am required to pay membership fees to an organization whose title includes the name ‘Upper Canada.’

  • Entity regulation encouraged to boost diversity

    Entity regulation encouraged to boost diversity

    Sep 25, 2017

    To really address barriers faced by racialized licensees, some lawyers say the Law Society of Upper Canada needs to implement entity regulation to significantly boost diversity in the legal profession. The law society is rolling out a first round of recommendations approved by Convocation in December 2016 to battle the barriers faced by racialized licensees.

  • $4.6 million sought in negligence lawsuit

    $4.6 million sought in negligence lawsuit

    Sep 11, 2017

    A lawyer who is already under investigation by the Law Society of Upper Canada for a $3-million deficiency in his trust account is now facing allegations of negligence over how he represented a former client in loan transactions.

  • Life benchers concerned over shrinking role

    Life benchers concerned over shrinking role

    Sep 5, 2017

    Life benchers are decrying their diminished role in the Law Society of Upper Canada’s governing committees. At a special Convocation meeting in August, some life benchers took the opportunity to express concerns they had over their exclusion from many committees.

  • A crisis of values over articling

    Sep 5, 2017

    Talk of the articling crisis has become white noise. Unfortunately, we have now internalized it: It has become a crisis of values within the profession.

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