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A Law Times column expressed concerns about extending the prison penalty for mischief on religious buildings, motivated by hate, to apply to all public buildings. Will doing this cause over-incarceration?

Voting for this poll has ended


 A Law Times column expressed concerns about extending the prison penalty for mischief on religious buildings, motivated by hate, to apply to all public buildings. Will doing this cause over-incarceration?

Yes, the extension of 10-year maximum sentences to new non-violent crimes will lead to problems, like more pre-trial detention of youths accused of mischief.
Votes: 29
74.4%  
No, extending the maximum sentence is a sage move that will demonstrate hate-motivated crimes are not condoned in Canada.
Votes: 10
25.6%  

Number of Voters   39
Start Voting   2017-02-06 00:00:00
End Voting   2017-03-06 00:00:00

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Law Times poll

A Law Times columnist says criminal law is out of step and argues there should be an immediate moratorium on HIV non-disclosure prosecutions, unless there is alleged intentional transmission. Do you agree?
Yes, the unjust criminalization of people living with HIV needs to change. The law has become more draconian even as HIV has become more manageable and as transmission risks decrease.
No, the law should remain as it is, and the Ministry of the Attorney General should not change its approach.