Focus On


  • Plaintiffs must prove chronic pain is serious impairment
    Jordan Dunlop says the regulations in the provincial Insurance Act spell out what a plaintiff is going to need to prove to be successful in a threshold motion.

    Plaintiffs must prove chronic pain is serious impairment

    Two recent decisions of the Ontario Superior Court in so-called “threshold motions” suggest that it is still a high legal bar to show that chronic pain suffered by plaintiffs after a motor vehicle accident will meet the “serious impairment” standard set out in the provincial Insurance Act.

  • Young lawyers looking for more flexibility
    Gina Alexandris says there is an assumption at law school that success means landing a job with a Bay Street law firm and focusing on becoming a partner.

    Young lawyers looking for more flexibility

    Heather Douglas feels the legal profession is in flux and she expects it to continue evolving. As a young lawyer establishing her practice at a Toronto firm, she’s unsure what to expect.

  • Firms should examine their realization rates
    Jasmine Daya says it is crucial for lawyers to run a ‘financially sound’ firm.

    Firms should examine their realization rates

    In moving from partner to principal of Fireman Daya & Co., Jasmine Daya wanted to be able to better gauge the financial health of the firm.

  • Client surveys can illuminate issues
    Howard Kaufman says he prefers more narrow surveys of clients, in order to assess performance.

    Client surveys can illuminate issues

    Client surveys can help pinpoint service issues within a firm, allowing them to address issues that might otherwise go unseen.

  • Succession plans needed for future success
    Deborah Howden says lawyers at her firm attended a retreat to figure out succession planning for different members.

    Succession plans needed for future success

    Several years ago, the partners at Will Davidson LLP found themselves dealing with four retirements and a death all within a 10-year period.

  • Morneau tax proposals still problematic
    Pamela Cross says one of the problems with income sprinkling is related to adult children who are attending university and are paid dividends.

    Morneau tax proposals still problematic

    Despite federal Liberal Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s attempt to soften his plan to tax private Canadian companies, tax lawyers still see major problems with the proposals.

  • Cameco and Oxford cases front and centre in 2018
    Claire Kennedy says there will be a ‘big focus’ on the General Anti-Avoidance Rule in 2018.

    Cameco and Oxford cases front and centre in 2018

    All eyes in the tax bar are on two important corporate tax cases currently wending their way through the courts, which could see judgments as early as the first half of 2018.

  • Who on the SCC will pick up the tax mantle?
    Vern Krishna says Supreme Court of Canada justices tend to grow into a role on the court.

    Who on the SCC will pick up the tax mantle?

    Now that Justices Beverley McLachlin and Marshall Rothstein have left the Supreme Court of Canada, many in the tax bar are wondering not only who will carry the tax torch going forward but if Canada’s top court will have the appetite to tackle complex tax cases.

  • U.S. tax reforms present challenges
    Scott Semer says the U.S. move to slash its corporate tax rate will ‘push a lot of governments to consider lowering their tax rates or certainly not to raise them.’

    U.S. tax reforms present challenges

    Tax lawyers say recent U.S. tax changes will present challenges for Canadian companies operating south of the border and U.S. subsidiaries operating here.

  • Condo tribunal won’t award costs to winning litigants
    Laura Glithero says costs consequences play an important role in the civil litigation system because it encourages the parties to reach reasonable resolutions and it discourages frivolous litigation.

    Condo tribunal won’t award costs to winning litigants

    The new Condominium Authority Tribunal — the province’s first of its kind launched last November — is designed to quickly resolve condominium disputes.

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