Focus On


  • When #MeToo reaches the boardroom
    Arlene O’Neill says that companies need to be aware how scandals related to the #MeToo movement can affect shareholders and shareholder value.

    When #MeToo reaches the boardroom

    The #MeToo movement has been impacting all levels of society, from political leaders to senior executives.

  • Designation for parenting co-ordinators will add stability
    Elizabeth Hyde says the legal intricacies in Ontario may have contributed to the growth in demand for practitioners who are also qualified as lawyers.

    Designation for parenting co-ordinators will add stability

    A new professional designation for parenting co-ordinators will help bring certainty to the growing field for both consumers and practitioners, says a senior member of the group that created it.

  • Elder financial abuse a pressing issue
    Laura Watts says the issue of elder financial abuse will worsen ‘if nothing is done about it quickly.’

    Elder financial abuse a pressing issue

    The investment industry must act now to get ahead of the growing problem of elder financial abuse, according to one of the authors of a major new study on the subject.

  • Judge calls for culture shift on consent motions
    Danna Fichtenbaum says the collegial nature of the estates bar may have encouraged the use of one-size-fits-all disclosure orders.

    Judge calls for culture shift on consent motions

    Will challengers in Toronto could face a higher bar to obtain disclosure after an estates list judge called for a culture shift away from generic consent motions for directions that enable fishing expeditions by disgruntled beneficiaries.

  • Time for archaic Divorce Act to be updated
    Nicholas Bala says the federal Divorce Act needs to be modernized.

    Time for archaic Divorce Act to be updated

    Leaders in the field of family law say they’re hopeful the federal government will finally update the “archaic” Divorce Act.

  • Social media posts not always part of litigation
    Colleen Burn says there is not a consensus on the scope of social media information that should normally be produced in personal injury litigation.

    Social media posts not always part of litigation

    Photos and other information on a protected portion of an individual’s Facebook page invoke privacy interests and will not necessarily be produced to the defence in personal injury litigation, an Ontario Superior Court judge ruled last month.

  • Cases could have impact on recreational facilities
    Suhuyini Abudulai says the Court of Appeal will have to resolve the potential conflict between the Consumer Protection Act and the Occupiers’ Liability Act.

    Cases could have impact on recreational facilities

    The Ontario Court of Appeal is being asked to interpret a potential conflict between two provincial statutes that could have significant ramifications for ski resorts and other recreational activities that carry the risk of injury.

  • Therapy dog allowed in civil jury trial
    Erin Murray says when a plaintiff testified with a service dog at a civil jury trial, the animal was not a distraction to jurors.

    Therapy dog allowed in civil jury trial

    A therapy dog was allowed in court to sit at the feet of the plaintiff while she testified in an Ontario Superior Court civil jury trial late last fall in what is believed to be a first in the province for this type of assistance in personal injury litigation.

  • Plaintiffs must prove chronic pain is serious impairment
    Jordan Dunlop says the regulations in the provincial Insurance Act spell out what a plaintiff is going to need to prove to be successful in a threshold motion.

    Plaintiffs must prove chronic pain is serious impairment

    Two recent decisions of the Ontario Superior Court in so-called “threshold motions” suggest that it is still a high legal bar to show that chronic pain suffered by plaintiffs after a motor vehicle accident will meet the “serious impairment” standard set out in the provincial Insurance Act.

  • Young lawyers looking for more flexibility
    Gina Alexandris says there is an assumption at law school that success means landing a job with a Bay Street law firm and focusing on becoming a partner.

    Young lawyers looking for more flexibility

    Heather Douglas feels the legal profession is in flux and she expects it to continue evolving. As a young lawyer establishing her practice at a Toronto firm, she’s unsure what to expect.

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