Focus On


  • Who on the SCC will pick up the tax mantle?
    Vern Krishna says Supreme Court of Canada justices tend to grow into a role on the court.

    Who on the SCC will pick up the tax mantle?

    Now that Justices Beverley McLachlin and Marshall Rothstein have left the Supreme Court of Canada, many in the tax bar are wondering not only who will carry the tax torch going forward but if Canada’s top court will have the appetite to tackle complex tax cases.

  • U.S. tax reforms present challenges
    Scott Semer says the U.S. move to slash its corporate tax rate will ‘push a lot of governments to consider lowering their tax rates or certainly not to raise them.’

    U.S. tax reforms present challenges

    Tax lawyers say recent U.S. tax changes will present challenges for Canadian companies operating south of the border and U.S. subsidiaries operating here.

  • Condo tribunal won’t award costs to winning litigants
    Laura Glithero says costs consequences play an important role in the civil litigation system because it encourages the parties to reach reasonable resolutions and it discourages frivolous litigation.

    Condo tribunal won’t award costs to winning litigants

    The new Condominium Authority Tribunal — the province’s first of its kind launched last November — is designed to quickly resolve condominium disputes.

  • Electric vehicle plan could present problems
    Rodrigue Escayola says it would be difficult for the province to impose some of the recommendations related to electric car chargers on all existing condo buildings in Ontario.

    Electric vehicle plan could present problems

    An attempt by the provincial government to introduce rules allowing the installation of electric car chargers in condominium buildings could run into some problems, say lawyers.

  • Short-term rentals present legal issues
    Denise Lash says the fact that condo bylaws trump any city regulations when it comes to short-term rentals can be a source of confusion.

    Short-term rentals present legal issues

    Condominium boards are adopting a variety of approaches to allow or prohibit short-term rentals, as municipalities and courts have also started to weigh in on the issue.

  • Condo boards have some wiggle room
    John De Vellis says a recent ruling confirmed condominium owners needed to approve a bulk cable television contract that included internet, and it was not valid without the agreement of the owners.

    Condo boards have some wiggle room

    When it comes to making changes in condominium complexes, boards have to clear a number of hurdles. Often, those hurdles aren’t as insurmountable as some people perceive them to be.

  • No dramatic shift in police treatment of pot
    Lawyers say it’s unclear if there will be major changes in how police investigate marijuana production, distribution and possession charges or how Crowns prosecute these offences.

    No dramatic shift in police treatment of pot

    The legalization of possessing small amounts of cannabis for recreational use is a campaign promise that the Liberal government of Justin Trudeau is following through on since it was elected in the fall of 2015.

  • Heightened stock market interest in cannabis persists
    Cheryl Reicin says cannabis companies that have grown quickly need to strengthen corporate governance.

    Heightened stock market interest in cannabis persists

    Earlier this month, some online brokerages in Canada received numerous complaints from customers about delays in placing trades and temporary outages.

  • Pot ad rules to be stricter than alcohol marketing
    Alice Tseng says recreational marijuana products will not be able to advertise in a way that is appealing to young people.

    Pot ad rules to be stricter than alcohol marketing

    The means of purchasing cannabis legally will soon be no different for people 19 years and older in Ontario than that of beer, wine or spirits.

  • Government-run pot stores coming
    Mary Ellen Bench says the locations of government-operated stores that sell marijuana will be up to the province, but that should not be an issue for municipalities.

    Government-run pot stores coming

    The Ontario government is promising to open 40 government-run cannabis stores in more than a dozen municipalities once federal legislation is enacted later this year to permit the sale of the product for recreational use.

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