Ontario Criminal


Appeal

Summary conviction appeals

Appeal had no apparent merit

Accused was found in driver’s seat of vehicle from which steam or smoke was emanating, with her head down. Responding police officer detected strong odour of alcohol coming from accused as she walked away, as well as slurred speech and red and bloodshot eyes. Accused was convicted of impaired driving. Her appeal from conviction was dismissed. Accused applied for leave to appeal. Application dismissed. Leave should be granted sparingly in such circumstances. Appeal had no apparent merit. Trial judge’s factual finding that accused’s conduct created realistic risk of danger to persons or property was amply supported by evidence. Accused admitted that she entered her vehicle with intention of driving it. She drank alcohol while in driver’s seat, with keys in ignition and car turned on. Passer-by found her at wheel and unresponsive. Accused had not identified any error of law by summary conviction appeal judge.

R. v. Stacey (Jul. 6, 2016, Ont. C.A., Paul Rouleau J.A., C.W. Hourigan J.A., and G. Pardu J.A., C61653) Leave to appeal decision at 127 W.C.B. (2d) 536 was refused. 132 W.C.B. (2d) 580.

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