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Monday, March 16, 2015

LSUC AWARDS ANNOUNCED

The Law Society of Upper Canada announced the recipients of its annual awards last week.

The 2015 law society medal recipients include Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP partner Craig Carter as well as University of Ottawa Faculty of Law Prof. Adam Dodek, a leading scholar on professionalism and ethics in the legal profession.

Susan Eng, vice president of CARP Canada, will also receive the medal for her advocacy work on a range of issues.

The LSUC is also honouring Lerners LLP partner Faisal Joseph, a lawyer who, according to the law society, “has demonstrated leadership, integrity and the highest skills in advocacy in his representation of clients whose cases do not garner the support of public opinion. He has often been the face and voice of the city’s Muslim community and worked diligently to promote interfaith relationships.”

Other recipients include Torys LLP senior litigation partner John Laskin, Stewart Lavigueur, a sole practitioner in Eganville, Ont., and Patrick Shea, a partner at Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP who was a driving force behind the law society’s recent honorary call to the bar that recognized law students who died in the First World War.

Chantal Tie, who teaches immigration and refugee law at the University of Ottawa, will receive the medal for her commitment to social justice at home and internationally. She has worked for the Canadian Bar Association on justice projects in Bangladesh and China and has volunteered on projects like The Equality Effect.

The law society will also award the 2015 Lincoln Alexander award to Paul Le Vay, a partner and a certified specialist in civil litigation at Stockwoods LLP.

Kimberly Murray, a member of the Kanesatake Mohawk Nation and executive director of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, will receive this year’s Laura Legge award while paralegal Paul Dray will take home the William J. Simpson distinguished paralegal award.  

NEW ANTITRUST HEAD AT NORTON ROSE

Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP competition and foreign investment lawyer Kevin Ackhurst is the firm’s new national practice head of antitrust and competition.

“It’s an exciting time to be leading our practice in Canada. With more than 100 antitrust lawyers around the world within Norton Rose Fulbright, it means we can leverage the experience and knowledge of our colleagues for the benefit of our clients,” said Ackhurst.

The change in leadership comes after the former practice head, Denis Gascon, joined the Federal Court of Canada bench.

LAWYER WINS ULTRAMAN RACE

While some lawyers are running for bencher these days, Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP’s Julie Paquette has literally been running — and winning — in the athletic sphere.

Paquette, a commercial real estate and franchising partner, was the winner of last month’s Women’s Ultraman Florida Race in Orlando, Fla. She won the race in 29 hours and 33 minutes with a margin of victory of two hours over the second-place runner.

“Julie had an excellent first day of swimming and biking, took the lead early, and never looked back. She trained extremely hard during the winter for the race while also pursuing a busy law practice,” said Pierre-Paul Henrie, Norton Rose Fulbright’s managing partner in Ottawa.

The Ultraman race, a weekend-long endurance test, consisted of a 10-kilometre swim and a 145-kilometre bike leg on the first day; a 275-kilometre bike leg on the second day; and a double marathon the next day.  

POLL RESULTS

The results of the latest Law Times online poll are in.

In light of the Supreme Court of Canada’s recent ruling allowing physician-assisted suicide, 44 per cent of participants say the federal government should move quickly to come up with and pass legislation before the one-year grace period provided by the court expires.

Another 22 per cent of respondents say the government should let the current law lapse at the end of the grace period while 24 per cent think it should seek an extension.

A further 10 per cent of poll participants felt the federal government should use the notwithstanding clause to keep the current law in place.

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Law Times Poll


The Law Society of Upper Canada’s governing body has approved a proposal to create a new licence for paralegals that would train them in some aspects of family law such as form completion, uncontested divorces and motions to change. Do you agree with this move?
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