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Monday, September 19, 2016

MERALI APPOINTED TRUSTEE

As the daughter of Tanzanian immigrants who were not able to practise their chosen profession in Canada, Isfahan Merali always knew she wanted to practise in an area that would let her help communities that face barriers.

The human rights lawyer was recently appointed to serve on the Law Foundation of Ontario Board of Trustees, a post where Merali says she hopes to help the organization reach out to vulnerable communities. 

Merali, who is tribunal counsel to the Consent and Capacity Board, says she also hopes to help share knowledge about access to justice and human rights.

Merali was elected as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada in 2015.

$80,000 DONATION BY THOMSON ROGERS 

Thomson Rogers is set to donate $80,000 to five different organizations that have helped its clients get back on their feet.

“You see these groups that do this work somewhat anonymously for the most part,” says Alan Farrer, the firm’s managing partner. 

“Some of this work is unnoticed by a lot of people except those who are injured and need the help. So we thought we’d shine a bit of a light on it and give back a little, too.”

The firm is inviting the public to go on its web site, www.thomsonrogers.com, to watch videos of the stories from the five different nominees and vote. The amount of money each organization will receive will depend on where it places in the voting.

TORONTO LAWYER LOOKS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Bonnie Fish wants to put the issue of affordable housing on more people’s radar.

Over the last six years, the Toronto lawyer has been involved in the Kehilla Residential Programme — a rental assistance fund that helps those in need meet their housing costs.

“You get up in the morning, you go to work and then you go back home at night and feel secure in your dwelling. 

If you’re not aware of those around that don’t have that same ability, you’re closing your eyes to the world around you,” says Fish, who is a partner at Fogler Rubinoff LLP.

Fish organizes an annual Kehilla event called Sukkahville, which is a design competition that challenges participants to build a sukkah — a temporary hut structure built during the Jewish festival of Sukkot. 

There will also be a panel discussion about affordable housing at the event, which takes place Sept. 22 at the Design Exchange in downtown Toronto.

LAW TIMES POLL

The Law Times recently reported that a bill to stop genetic discrimination will be debated in the House of Commons.

Readers were asked if they think legislation to prevent genetic discrimination is needed.

Around 69 per cent said yes, legislation to prevent genetic discrimination is needed, as this is a serious and emerging problem.

The remaining 31 per cent said no, legislation is not needed, as the actual threat of genetic discrimination is negligible, and the solutions being proposed won’t be an efficient way to address the issue.

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Law Times reports that the Correctional Service Canada has been found to be negligent in the severe beating of an inmate. Do you think inmate safety at jails and prisons needs significant improvement?
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