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Monday, November 14, 2011

PARIS LAWYER RETURNS TO BLG

Craig Chiasson has returned to Borden Ladner Gervais LLP five years after he left to become an arbitrator at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP.

Chiasson becomes an arbitrator with BLG’s international trade and arbitration group.

“Craig will be a key addition to our international arbitration team,” said Gerry Ghikas, national leader of BLG’s international trade and arbitration group.

“We are thrilled that he has decided to join us. We are seeing significant growth in our investment treaty practice that began with our strategic acquisition several years ago of Thomas & Partners in 2008.

Our international arbitration counsel practice has always been solid, but we are now seeing a significant increase in demand. We look forward to adding to our team Craig’s substantial experience in both commercial and investment treaty arbitrations.”

Chiasson practises commercial and investment treaty dispute resolution. His work includes international arbitration in the energy, mining, telecommunications, and shipping sectors.

“I am excited to be able to work with such a highly regarded group,” said Chiasson.

“I see huge potential for growth in trade and arbitration counsel work, and I look forward to using my experience to benefit BLG’s clients.”

Chiasson began at BLG in 2001 as a trainee and later moved on to an associate’s position before he moved to Freshfields in January 2006.

Other staffing changes at BLG include Cynthia Westaway, who becomes counsel at the Ottawa office after leaving Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP; Adam Guy, who becomes an associate in Toronto following an articling position at the firm; Isaac Tang, who joins the Toronto office as an associate; and Daniel Girlando, an associate who previously articled at BLG.

GOWLINGS IN TOP 5 FOR M&A

Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP has ranked fifth for its involvement in announced Canadian transactions during the first three quarters of the year.

The firm advised on 41 transactions in announced mergers-and-acquisitions deals.

“It is gratifying that the latest league table rankings recognize Gowlings among the leading players in Canadian M&A,” said Stephen Pike, managing partner at Gowlings in Toronto.

“We take pride in advising not only on multibillion-dollar mandates but also on many mid-market transactions, assembling multidisciplinary teams from across the firm to help exceed our clients’ expectations in achieving their domestic and cross-border business objectives.”

Mergermarket also ranked Gowlings fourth in mid-market Canadian mergers and acquisitions.

NEW DIRECTOR AT YORK CENTRE

Osgoode Hall Law School law professor Jamie Cameron is the new interim director of the York Centre for Public Policy and Law.

In her new role, Cameron will work to create public policy and law research related to government agencies, non-governmental organizations, citizen advocacy groups, and non-profit organizations in Canada and abroad.

“We are very fortunate that Jamie has agreed to assume this position and bring her wealth of constitutional, public, and criminal law expertise to the YCPPL as well as her strong network in academia, the bar and bench, the media, and government,” said Osgoode dean Lorne Sossin.

Cameron replaces Osgoode professor Lisa Philipps, who recently became York’s associate vice president for research.

GILLER WINNER SPEAKS AT LSUC

Canadian author and Giller prize winner Joseph Boyden will read excerpts from his work on Louis Riel at the Law Society of Upper Canada’s annual Louis Riel Day event on Nov. 16.

A discussion forum on legal developments in Métis land claims and hunting and harvesting rights will also take place. It will include a panel on the Manitoba Métis Federation v. Canada case that’s set to go before the Supreme Court of Canada on Dec. 13.

The event begins at 4 p.m. at the LSUC in Toronto. To register, send an e-mail to equityevents@lsuc.on.ca.

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