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Monday, February 22, 2010

NEW HIRES AT BLG

Borden Ladner Gervais LLP is adding three new members to its intellectual property practice.

Jamie Mills and Chantal Saunders have joined the Ottawa office as partners and Beverley Moore as an associate.

Mills practises in all areas of intellectual property law, including patents, trademarks, and copyright with a focus on litigation, particularly on pharmaceutical patent litigation.

Saunders specializes in intellectual property with an emphasis on patent litigation, also particularly on pharmaceutical litigation.

Moore practises in the area of intellectual property law with a focus on pharmaceutical patent litigation as well.

Saunders specializes in intellectual property with an emphasis on patent litigation, also particularly on pharmaceutical litigation.

Moore practises in the area of intellectual property law with a focus on pharmaceutical patent litigation as well.

LAWYERS REACH OUT TO STUDENTS

A community legal outreach program recently held in Toronto aimed at engaging students from at-risk and economically disadvantaged neighbourhoods.

Careers in Law was held for students from the Regent Park, Lawrence Heights, and Jane and Finch neighbourhoods.

The Toronto Lawyers Association, in conjunction with Pathways to Education, a community group promoting education for youth, held the event, which it said it hopes to carry forward annually.

The session began with a mock trial demonstration, which Superior Court Justice Alison Harvison Young presided over. A discussion on career options in the legal profession followed.

EXCLUDE CANADIAN INTERROGATIONS, NICHOLSON TELLS U.S.

The federal government has asked U.S. authorities to exclude evidence collected by Canadian agents in interrogations of Omar Khadr.

Justice Minister Rob Nicholson made the official request in response to a recent Supreme Court of Canada ruling that Khadr’s rights under the Charters of Rights and Freedoms had been violated by illegal interrogations.

Nicholson said the diplomatic note sought “assurances that any evidence or statements shared with U.S.  authorities as a result of the interviews of Mr. Khadr by Canadian agents and officials in 2003 and 2004 not be used against him by U.S. authorities in the context of proceedings before the military commission or elsewhere.”

In a release, Nicholson reiterated that the top court hadn’t directed the government to push for Khadr’s repatriation.

In that ruling, which overturned lower court orders seeking Khadr’s return to Canada, the top court explicitly deferred to the government on matters of foreign relations.

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