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Monday, December 20, 2010

IAN BLUE JOINS GARDINER ROBERTS

Ian Blue has switched his practice from Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP to Toronto firm Gardiner Roberts LLP.

Blue specializes in complex business, administrative, constitutional, energy, and environmental law issues.

“Gardiner Roberts LLP is an established full-service law firm with a 90-year history of providing legal advice, has an active and growing litigation practice, and is a perfect fit for my practice and professional interests,” Blue said in a statement.

DAVIES ALUMNUS RETURNS

Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP has hired Jeffrey Nadler at its New York office.

Nadler, who started his career with Davies’ Toronto office in 1993, said he was very happy to rejoin the firm.

“I am fortunate to have started my legal career at the firm, where I was trained by some of the best and brightest business lawyers in Canada, and throughout my career I have taken with me the firm’s philosophy and commitment to excellence and creativity,” he said.

Nadler will rejoin the firm’s mergers-and-acquisitions, corporate finance, and securities and private equity practices. He has also had spells in New York with Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP and in Tel Aviv, where he spent his last two years as a partner at a leading Israeli law firm.

“Jeff brings to Davies an exceptional depth of knowledge and international experience,” said Shawn McReynolds, Davies’ managing partner in Toronto. “Also, we have a long history of working with Jeff on complex cross-border transactions, which are the primary focus of our practice in New York.

He’ll add to our depth and breadth of capability there and reinforce our ability to provide seamless Canadian and U.S. legal advisory services for these kinds of transactions.”

SCC REJECTS CODINA’S LATEST APPEAL

Former lawyer Angelina Marie Codina has failed in her latest bid to appeal her fraud convictions at the Supreme Court of Canada.

It’s not the first time she has tried to reverse the judgment since her conviction and sentencing on charges of falsifying a document and defrauding the Ontario Legal Aid Plan in 1998.

Two years later, the Ontario Court of Appeal dismissed her initial appeal. Then in 2001, the SCC rejected an application for leave to appeal. In 2008, Codina sought to file a notice of application for leave to reopen the matter at the Court of Appeal, but it wasn’t accepted for filing.

Now the Supreme Court has denied her application to have the registrar’s order set aside.

AVIATION LAWYER LANDS AT BLAKES

Blake Cassels & Graydon LLP has signed up aviation lawyer Donald Gray as a partner.

Gray will join the firm’s aerospace group on Jan. 1. He advises aircraft lessors, financiers, manufacturers, and international airlines on commercial and regulatory matters.

“Donald will add incredible strength to our aerospace practice,” said firm chairman Brock Gibson. “He has extensive experience and expertise in all aspects of aviation law and we are delighted that he has decided to join Blakes.”

Gray is a frequent writer and speaker on aircraft finance both nationally and abroad. He’s also an active aircraft owner and pilot qualified to fly in Canada, the United States, and South Africa.

U OF T IDENTIFIES 12 GRADS TO WATCH

Nexus magazine, published by the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, has unveiled its Decade Dozen list of outstanding alumni to watch over the next 10 years.

Sachin Aggarwal, Rob Centa, Steven Elliott, John Hannaford, Rubsun Ho, Sonia Lawrence, Marcia Moffat, Benjamin Perrin, Rachel Sklar, Lara Tessaro, Maggie Wente, and Cornell Wright, all graduated during the last 20 years, were nominated by their classmates.

“Our alumni are an incredible source of strength for our law school,” said dean Mayo Moran. “They are leaders in so many areas. The graduates chosen as our Decade Dozen exemplify the remarkable diversity and talent of our alumni community, and we are very proud of their achievements.”

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